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The bridge is still out, but the forest remains

In an increasingly modern world, Adirondackers should recognize how fortunate we are to have such a special place for adventure, recreation and solitude. In an increasingly modern world, Adirondackers should recognize how fortunate we are to have such a special place for adventure, recreation and solitude.

We live in a wild place that continues to get wilder, as the rest of the world becomes more domesticated. We have experienced the return of the moose and bald eagles. Loons still dot the ponds, and peregrine falcons soar over the cliffs. Deer are plentiful, and heritage strains of brook trout remain in remote ponds. There are places where a man, or woman, can still become hopelessly lost. Such is the draw.

Certainly, there remains much to be done. However, from the viewpoint of someone that usually has his boots on the ground, an oar in the water, an eye on the sky, a flyrod in hand or pine needles underneath his mattress; there is no place I'd rather call home!

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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