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Geese go away, and don't come back another day

Despite rampant rumors that the state of New York had plans to implement a massive effort to reduce the state's burgeoning population of Canada geese, the NYSDEC wants the public to know that there is no such plan.

In an article in the New York Times, dated July 23, it was reported that the state intended to eliminate several hundred thousand geese, in an effort to bring the population under control.

Information that was initially provided by the New York Times was later used by numerous media sources in follow-up articles, including one of my own.

As a result, NYSDEC wildlife staffers have been forced to respond to a barrage of calls and e-mails about the false stories concerning efforts to eliminate Canada geese.

In the village of Saranac Lake, there has been an ongoing battle to control Canada geese along the shorefront of Lake Flower for several years. A family of geese settled on the lake almost a decade ago, and over the years, their numbers continued to grow.

The goose problem is most noticeable in and around the state boat launch in the center of the village, where the park's extensive lawn has been regularly soiled with their droppings. It has been difficult to walk anywhere near the waterfront without steeping in goose poop, which is extremely slippery after a rain or in the morning dew.

Numerous efforts to eradicate the geese have been attempted by both the village and the DEC, including a major goose roundup, netting and relocation campaign. The village also attempted to scare the birds away by placing life-size, wooden silhouettes of dogs along the shoreline.

Neither of these methods had any affect on the geese or their droppings. The captured geese, which are known to imprint on a specific body of water, returned shortly after their capture and removal. And, they often could be found basking in the shadow of the large black, plywood silhouettes.

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