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Guide to the Schroon River at the Adirondack Museum

BLUE MOUNTAIN LAKE - Many people today are unaware that Adirondack river log drives began on the little river of Schroon in 1813. Thousands of logs once floated down the Schroon to the Hudson River and mills beyond.

On Sunday, April 11, 2010, Mike Prescott, a New York State Licensed Guide, will offer a program entitled "Armchair Paddlers' Guide to the Schroon River" at the Adirondack Museum. The presentation is the last of Cabin Fever Sunday series for the season.

"The history of human interaction with the Schroon River is rich with stories of logging, industry, tourism, and community development," said museum marketing director, Susan Dineen. "We are very excited to offer this program in order to tell those stories."

Mike Prescott is a retired secondary school principal and NYS Licensed Guide. He spent three summers working with the Adirondack Cooperative Loon Program and has logged many hours observing and photographing loons. He spent thirty-four years working with young people, first as a history teacher and then as a secondary school principal.

"I have always found nature to be healing and rejuvenating," he said. "Especially the history of the lakes, rivers, and streams of the Adirondacks."

"The Armchair Paddlers' Guide to the Schroon River" will be illustrated with vintage photos and postcards, as well as contemporary photography that shows what a paddler today would experience along the river.

The Schroon River is more than 60 miles in length, part of the Hudson River Watershed that flows south to the Atlantic Ocean passing within five miles of Lake George, part of the Lake Champlain Watershed flowing north towards the St. Lawrence River.

There are sections of the river for all recreational enthusiasts.

"It is such a dynamic river, offering a lot to outdoor enthusiast," said Prescott.

Fisherman can enjoy the deep water fishing of Schroon Lake, while the faster waters of Tumblehead Falls challenge fly fisherman. Paddlers can drift along the lazy current of the upper Schroon and whitewater kayakers can play in the class III and IV rapids. Boaters can enjoy the 14-mile length of Schroon Lake. Hikers and wilderness adventurers are able to explore the mountains, lakes, and ponds of the Hoffman Notch, Dix Mountain, and the Pharaoh Lake Wilderness areas as well as the Hammond Pond Wild Forest area.

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