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Stack' for Best Deals

Did you know that most stores accept two coupons for the same item? Many stores' coupon policies allow stacking, the term couponers use for pairing a manufacturer coupon (found in newspaper inserts and on the Internet) with a store coupon that the store offers in a local flyer or on its Web site. Pairing the manufacturer coupon and the retailer coupon results in significant savings for you. Often, a shopper who stacks coupons in this way can get items things for free.

I know what you're must be thinking: Free? Yes, free. Completely free. Let me give you a few examples of sales that I've recently enjoyed.

Shampoo is on sale for $3. The store's flyer has a $2 store coupon for the shampoo. I have a $1 manufacturer coupon for the same brand of shampoo. Using both coupons together results in $3 savings, and I go home with a free bottle of shampoo.

Frozen vegetables are on sale for $1 a bag. The store's Web site has a store coupon for 50 cents off, and I have a 50-cent manufacturer coupon for the same brand of vegetables. Using these together saves me $1 - my vegetables are free.

Even when items aren't free, they're often significantly cheaper with stacking.

A half-gallon of organic milk is on sale for $3. The store's Web site has a store coupon for $1.75 off this brand of milk. This milk also has a Web site with a printable manufacturer coupon for 50 cents off a half-gallon. Now, my carton of organic milk is just 75 cents.

Learning that stores allow customers to stack coupons is a revelation to new coupon users, and stacking is a big factor in bringing your total grocery bill down to a manageable level. When I go to the grocery store, almost every item I buy is significantly less than the price most other people pay. I buy items with coupons when the items are at their lowest point in the sales cycle, and I stack store and manufacturer coupons together to achieve the lowest prices possible.

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