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Emerald Ash Borer found in New York

"This discovery emphasizes the need to establish a national early detection network around major ports of entry so we can intercept these pests before they become established," said Troy Weldy, director of Ecological Management for The Nature Conservancy. "It is also important for citizens to understand that these pests are easily transported in firewood. We ask everyone to do their part by only burning wood close to where they buy it."

DEC Commissioner Pete Grannis had similar sentiments.

"This is yet another wake-up call for all New Yorkers that invasive species pose a grave threat to the health of our natural resources and ecosystems, and ultimately, our economy. Tough but practical measures, such as quarantines, firewood regulations, public education and other regulatory actions will continue to be needed if we are to limit the damage from EAB and other invasives."

What to look for

Adult beetles leave distinctive D-shaped exit holes in the outer bark of the branches and the trunk. Other signs of infection include tree canopy dieback, yellowing, extensive sprouting from the roots and trunk (called "epicormic shoots") and browning of leaves. Infested trees may also exhibit woodpecker damage from larvae extraction. Report suspected damage to the state by calling 1-866-640-0652.

John Gereau is managing editor of Denton Publications and an avid outdoorsman. He can be reached at johng@denpubs.com.

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