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PhD. says H.S. football is important

With the start of the school year comes the passage of a new high school football season. Unfortunately, the media will typically focus on at least one negative high school that will overshadow all the positive stories.

With all the bad news about school sports, is high school football a liability? Should we allow our children to play such a high-risk sport? Would it not be better to stop playing football or any risky sport?

Author and sports expert Gregg Steinberg, PhD., told the Rutland Tribune that While high school football does come with its risks, the benefits greatly outweigh the difficulties. Players learn so many life lessons from football and sport in generalthey learn discipline, humility, racial tolerance and patience.

During the Tribs interview with Steinberg, he explained, All these life lessons learned on the gridiron give athletes a competitive advantage in their future in the business world.

His new book, "Flying Lessons: 122 strategies to equip your child to soar into life with confidence and competence," (Thomas Nelson Publishers), Steinberg gives many tips and tools to area parents about the benefits of sport.

Flying Lessons illustrates success stories of famous athletes as well as scientists and artists and applies those strategies to everyday problems. Flying Lessons is a tool box to help parents guide their children down the path of success.

Steinberg is an associate professor of sport psychology at Austin Peay State University. He is ranked by Golf Digest as one of the greatest masterminds of the game. As a practitioner and internationally known speaker in this field, he is a frequent contributor to Fox News, CNN Headline News, and the Golf Channel.

The Trib: What effect do the recent scandals with so-called role models like Lindsay Lohan and various sports figures have on our children?

Steinberg: What are some of these most recent scandals?

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