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This Week's Review: "Michael Clayton"

Anyone involved with team sports knows the value of working together as a unit. Whether its a sixth grade boys basketball team, a high school girls soccer team, or a professional organization like the New England Patriots, having a group of athletes playing in a cohesive fashion always translates into tough competition.

Logic dictates that the better the players, the better the team, but this is not always the case. It is a misconception that a team loaded with great players will always win. For example, while Americas Olympic Dream Teams have traditionally won basketball gold, our dominance over international competition has faded in recent years as foreign competitors have begun to focus on the finer aspects of the athletic entity as a whole.

The Yankees have also highlighted this phenomenon repeatedly over the last several years. While their payroll remains by far the largest in Major League Baseball, they have not been able to translate this expense on global talent into World Series titles. Granted, the Red Sox are not far behind the Yankees in payroll, but they seem to be far more team-oriented. Put talent and teamwork together and you have the perfect storm for success.

Personally I have been involved in various basketball leagues for over thirty years. In that time, Ive played on every possible team combination, from being the worst player on the floor to being the best; Ive been on teams that went undefeated and Ive been on teams that have lost every game. But no matter what the scenario may have been, the most rewarding experiences I have had were the ones where I was surrounded by a group of players who worked in a harmonic fashion. In the instances where youve assembled sound talent and then, through luck or hard work, you come together as a team, that is when dominance arrives and great seasons unfold. Ask anyone who has experienced this phenomenon and they will undoubtedly speak of the valuable life lessons to be learned.

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